9 articles General

Beyond the rate: Applying for overdraft protection at Tangerine Bank

Overdraft protection at Tangerine

If you’ve ever been hit with an NSF (non-sufficient funds) fee, you know that it’s costly and inconvenient. With overdraft or coverdraft protection, you can avoid such fees, often for free. Here’s how to set up overdraft protection at Tangerine Bank.

You get charged an NSF fee if there is a debit against your account (such as someone cashing a cheque you wrote) and you do not have enough money in your account to cover the debit. By default, your account is not allowed to be “overdrawn” — in other words, it cannot have a negative balance. Tangerine’s NSF fee is $40. Not only are you charged the fee, but your cheque bounces and you’ll have to re-do the transaction (such as issuing a new cheque) when you have enough money in your account again. You might also get charged another fee by the recipient to cover their inconvenience.

Overdraft protection allows your account to go into a negative balance (up to a certain limit). At Tangerine, you must apply to have this protection enabled. Overdraft protection at Tangerine is free if you do not use it at all, or when you use it, if you transfer enough money into the account by 9:00pm Pacific time / 12:00am Eastern time on the night that your account is overdrawn. Otherwise, it costs $5 in each month that you use it (no matter how many times you use it in a month), plus 19% annual interest until the overdraft amount is paid back. Tangerine will e-mail you whenever you’ve overdrawn your account.

Setting up overdraft protection at Tangerine Bank

First, in your online interface, click the “Overdraft” link on your chequing account:

Step 1: Click the Overdraft link

Then, click the “Apply” button:

Step 2: Click the Apply button

Then, agree to the terms:

Step 3: Agree to the terms

Finally, fill in the application form, which asks for your employment information as well as other personal information:

Step 4a: Enter your employment information

Step 4b: Enter more personal finance information

In some cases, you’re done and are approved immediately. Note that it does a credit bureau check and you might get denied.

How to avoid overdraft fees

If you have enough money in your Tangerine savings account, you can simply transfer the money instantly to the chequing account the same day that an overdraft occurs. Otherwise, if you have enough money elsewhere, consider sending yourself an Interac e-Transfer from another financial institution, since the money transfers close to instantly, allowing for what is usually less than a 30 minute delay between when you send the Interac e-Transfer and when you receive an e-mail or phone link to deposit the money. Many financial institutions offer free Interac e-Transfers on no-fee accounts, including Alterna Bank, EQ Bank, and Motive Financial. (Credit to forum user Adam1 for the idea!)

Not a client of Tangerine Bank? Other financial institutions offer similar overdraft features, including “coverdraft” from Alterna Bank, which triggers an automatic, internal transfer of money between your Alterna Bank accounts whenever one of them is overdrawn.

2019 Canadian personal income tax filing survey results

The results are in! For almost 3 weeks in April 2019, HighInterestSavings.ca ran an online survey of how 201 people file their personal income taxes in Canada.

Have you filed your taxes yet?

15% of respondents wait until the last week in April to file their taxes. 1.5% file in February, while another 1.5% file in May or June. Naturally, the bulk of people file in March (36%) or April (61%). You are average if you file on April 4, whereas the median is roughly the same on April 5.

Who files your taxes?

81% of respondents do their taxes themselves, and of that number, 68% of them believe their tax return is “simple”. 14% of respondents use a tax professional, and of them, 41% rate their tax return as “simple” while the other 59% rate their tax return as “complex”. If you have a family member who does your taxes for free, count yourself as the lucky 4%, or feel guilty that you’re not the 1/201 respondents who said they pay a family member.

How much do you pay to do your taxes?

48% of respondents pay nothing at all, either to someone else or for software. People who pay someone else average $275, although this drops to just under $100 for a self-rated “simple” return. If people pay for software, including donations, the average cost is $26.50.

Software: the Big 4

For those who do their own taxes, 8% of people either eschew software altogether or use only spreadsheets. For the 92% of people who do use software, the vast majority of them (92% of the 92%) use one of StudioTax, TurboTax, SimpleTax, or UFile. The full breakdown of software from our survey is as follows:

  • StudioTax: 27.7%
  • TurboTax: 25.2%
  • SimpleTax: 20.6%
  • UFile: 18.1%
  • GenuTax: 2.6%
  • H&R Block: 1.9%
  • FutureTax: 0.6%
  • myTaxExpress: 0.6%
  • Imp├┤tExpert: 0.6%
  • TaxFreeway: 0.6%
  • ProFile: 0.6%
  • TaxTron: 0.6%

What are some key features in personal income tax return software? 57% of respondents mentioned that ease of use is important, and to 44% of respondents, free or low cost is important. 15% say they use a given piece of software simply of habit, 5% mention NETFILE as a reason for their choice, and 4% cite security as a key feature.

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TransferWise vs OFX comparison: CAD to USD transfers

United Nations flags

At my job at a web development company, we frequently need to make currency exchange transfers to pay contractors and accept payments from international clients. This most often involves transfers in both directions between Canada (CAD) and the United States of America (USD), but sometimes between Canada and Europe (EUR) and between Canada and Australia (AUD) as well. At the beginning, we used our bank (RBC Royal Bank of Canada) but quickly discovered that we were losing a lot of money on currency exchange and wire transfer fees even after we were put in touch with their preferred rate currency exchange business solution. If you need to transfer currency internationally or even between 2 different currency accounts in Canada, it is a no-brainer to consider using a company or service other than your bank. We use a combination of TransferWise and OFX (formerly CanadianForex). What I’ve learned in using TransferWise and OFX can apply to both business and personal transactions.

TransferWise advertises that they provide you with the mid-market rate, which is true. But they charge you a percentage fee on top. OFX, on the other hand, gives you a rate worse than the mid-market rate (but still much better than you’d get at a bank), and charges a $15 flat fee for smaller transfer amounts (below $10,000 Canadian dollars) and no fees for amounts above $10,000 CAD. (September 16 update: OFX has given me this referral link that waives the $15 fee for new accounts.)

Generally, I have found OFX to be cheaper except for transfers of only a few hundred dollars, where the $15 flat fee is a larger percentage. In terms of pure dollars, OFX is the clear winner for me for larger transfers: for example, for a recent transfer of $23,000 USD to CAD, OFX provided a rate of 1.3109 and no fees, for a total amount received of $30,150.70 CAD. TransferWise provided a much better rate at 1.3159, but charged fees of $138.17 USD, for a total amount received of $30,083.88.

(It’s important to note, though, that when I first looked into OFX, I had to call them to get the preferred rate that’s currently on my account. This is probably not difficult to get from them, but it does require you to call them. On the other hand, TransferWise offers the same rate for everybody.)

But the story is not that simple once you dig into the details. First of all, you need to consider whether you’re sending money or receiving money.

If you’re receiving money, do you have a USD bank account in Canada or just a CAD account? It can be convenient to have a USD bank account in Canada to deposit cheques, receive wire transfers, transfer money to CAD at a time that’s right for you, or maybe not even transfer all of the money back to CAD if you need to then pay out some of that money in USD again (thus saving transfer costs x 2). But cheques are slow and require your time to receive and deposit them, and sometimes inconvenient for clients to produce (and mail to you!). If you receive a wire transfer, there is a fee to receive it ($17 at RBC), a fee for your client to send it, and sometimes an additional fee that gets charge in transit — for some transfers I notice that we’ve lost another $18.50 by the time it arrives in our account.

Having a US dollar account in the USA can save you and your clients money. But it also requires setup and additional management. TransferWise has a killer feature for receiving payments: the borderless account. The borderless account gives you account numbers within Australia, England, Europe, and the USA so that clients can send money to an account local to their country or within the EU. This is incredibly convenient and helps you receive the money much faster, with a much lower or no transaction cost for your clients. I have found the borderless account to be very useful and easy to set up. Although I still default to using OFX to transfer incoming money from USD to CAD, the convenience of TransferWise sometimes wins out.

For sending money (from a CAD account to contractors’ international accounts), OFX is the winner in my case, although TransferWise might soon become more competitive. The main issue is that TransferWise has more limited and costly options for getting the money to them. TransferWise is currently only a bill payment option for the Bank of Montreal, National Bank of Canada, Central 1 credit unions, and Tangerine Bank. TransferWise does not support pre-authorized debits for business accounts, whereas OFX does. This means that with OFX you can incur minimal or no additional fees (on top of their exchange rate spread) to send the money. TransferWise charges quite a meaningful additional fee for sending money using a debit card or a credit card. I actually found TransferWise’s fees for funding a payment with a credit card to be cheaper than with a debit card, but then I was hit with a surprise cash advance and interest fee on our Scotiabank credit card (which they later did a one-time refund for). TransferWise claims that the additional Scotiabank charges were the result of a mis-classification of the transaction on the part of Scotiabank that does not happen with all credit cards, although I have not verified this.

In general, I am quite pleased with both TransferWise and OFX. I can fully recommend them as being convenient, reliable, and much cheaper than using my bank for transfers between Canadian dollars and at least US dollars, Euros, and Australian dollars. There are several factors to consider beyond the rates and fees that TransferWise and OFX charge, thus it could be worth it for you to be a customer of both of them!

CanadianForex review: great foreign exchange rates and support

I’ve been using XE Trade for a few years for personal currency exchange and international funds transfers for my small business. I started to try CanadianForex a few months ago and have been very pleased with its rates and support.

The basic premise is relatively straightforward and the same as XE Trade: you submit currency exchange deals through their online interface, send them the money in the source currency, and they deliver the money in the destination currency to your account or a foreign account within a few days. Therefore, you can use it for currency exchanges between your own accounts, or to send money internationally (as long as it’s between different currencies). Especially for sending money internationally on a regular basis, using an online service is often much more convenient than a traditional bank.

Here’s my review of CanadianForex, specifically compared against XE Trade.

Setup

Creating an account at CanadianForex is very straightforward, although just like XE Trade, you have to provide (for a business account, at least) some sensitive information to them, including:

  • A signed bank statement
  • A client agreement form signed by 2 directors
  • A copy of your driver’s licence

Exchange rates

I’ve found CanadianForex’s exchange rates to be better than XE Trade, at least for transferring between Canadian dollars and: US dollars, Euros, and Australian dollars. CanadianForex’s standard fee is $15 for transactions under $10,000 (and no fees for transactions above $10,000); while XE Trade usually charges no fees at all, CanadianForex is still better (as of January 2015) by a significant amount for trades that are more than a few hundred dollars.

Some example comparisons between CanadianForex and XE Trade after deducting the CanadianForex fee:

  • Sending approximately $5,500 CAD to Australia (AUD): the recipient got 40 AUD more with CanadianForex
  • Sending approximately $8,000 CAD to Germany (EUR): the recipient got 48 EUR more with CanadianForex
  • Sending approximately $7,000 CAD to the United States (USD): the recipient got 50 USD more with CanadianForex

In the case of sending money to Brazil, CanadianForex still charges the same $15 fee, whereas XE Trade charges an additional $22 wire fee. This resulted in similar savings as above with CanadianForex.

I’ve also found CanadianForex’s exchange rates to be slightly better than RBC’s foreign exchange rates, at least for transferring US dollars to Canadian dollars within my business account. However, the difference was only a few dollars for some of sample amounts I tested.

Process

The trades happen completely online, although you have to speak to a CanadianForex representative over the phone to complete your initial account setup, and you also receive a verification phone call from them after your first trade.

To book a trade, you must first set up recipients, including their bank account information. Then, you get a quote for the exchange you’d like to make, and click a “Finalise” button. If you’ve set up direct debit, the money will be removed from your account by the next business day. Otherwise, you send CanadianForex the money using your bank’s bill payment system. Once CanadianForex receives the money, they will send an Electronic Funds Transfer (EFT) or wire payment, depending on the destination country, to the recipient.

Customer service

You can contact CanadianForex by phone or e-mail. This is the same as with XE Trade. However, CanadianForex really emphasizes personal contact by assigning you a specific account manager (for a business account at least) and making you speak to them so that they can walk you through their services over the phone. With XE Trade you can set up your account and trade for years without ever needing talking to a person, let alone be assigned a specific contact.

I once had an issue when XE Trade mysteriously removed one of my recipient records without notifying me, and refused to tell me why when I phoned them. After I pushed for some explanation over the phone, they promised to follow up and never did. The recipient was eventually re-instated, although I was never notified about this. Of course, there is a chance that this could happen with CanadianForex, but I expect that they would be more communicative and cooperative with me in such a case. And to be fair, the situation with XE Trade might have been an edge case.

Other notes

  • Weekends and holidays: CanadianForex is closed on weekends and holidays. In other words, you can sign in to your account but you cannot submit any trades. This is probably a good thing; with XE Trade I discovered that the exchange rate spread was much worse on weekends and holidays versus normal business days.
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XE Trade: sending money internationally fee-free

After trying out XE Trade last year to convert Canadian dollars into US dollars for my own personal use, I decided to try it for business use. My company has a sub-contractor in the UK, and our alternatives were to send a wire transfer or a cheque. A wire transfer typically charges both the sender and the receiver fees, while a cheque takes time to send, deposit, and clear.

XE Trade was easy to use, fee-free, and fast. By “fee-free” I mean that they did not charge an extra fee on top of their regular currency exchange spread — and I’ve found their spread to be quite competitive. I just had to choose “ACH/EFT” as the sending method. I now intend to use XE Trade on a regular basis for my company.

The setup process required me to send XE Trade quite a few company documents electronically. Once set up, however, I just had to enter the recipient’s bank account information and then pay a bill as if it were any regular bill (such as a credit card bill). For more information on that general process, see my previous review.

Here is the timeline in business days for how long it took for me to set up a business account with XE Trade and send a payment in Canadian dollars from a Canadian bank to be deposited in British pounds in a UK bank.

Day 1: Registered for an XE Trade account
Day 1: Received an e-mail (in my spam folder) asking that I send over scanned documents (driver’s licence, certificate of incorporation, articles of association, names of shareholders owning 25% of more of the business) to verify my identity
Day 2: Received a reminder e-mail asking that I send over scanned documents to verify my identity
Day 3: I sent over scanned documents
Day 4: Received notification that the account was activated
Day 5: I initiated a trade (CAD in Canada to GBP in the UK) with a locked in rate based on that day, chose “ACH/EFT” as the sending method, and paid the bill through my bank’s online interface
Day 8: Received a notification e-mail that the money was sent to the recipient
Day 11: Money was deposited into the destination account; no fees were deducted on either end

The time between sending and receiving money took 6 business days.

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