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Ontario Hydro
October 19, 2020
12:50 pm
Bill
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76F in the house? I'd be sleepy all the time.

October 19, 2020
4:34 pm
gicjunkie
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topgun said

When I bought my house I changed to a digital thermostat. It was definitely purchased in Canada. The settings were Fahrenheit not Centigrade. 0C is 32F. 100C is 212F. To convert F to C. 76F - 32F / 1.8 = 24.4C.  

Don't know when you bought your house, but most thermostats that I have seen in about the last 25 years or more have an option on them for F or C settings. You should check it out if interested. Having said that, I choose to use Fahrenheit settings because it is more precise for my purposes.

topgun said

I leave my thermostat the same all year round. 76F. Just flip from heat to cool.  

I also would be asleep all the time at 76F in the winter.

I agree with the numerous people who feel that for the minor differences between TOU and Tiered Pricing, I'd rather not have to worry about when to do laundry, cooking, etc. and just use the Tiered Pricing method. Much more relaxing existence.

October 19, 2020
8:21 pm
Londonguy
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topgun said

When I bought my house I changed to a digital thermostat. It was definitely purchased in Canada. The settings were Fahrenheit not Centigrade. 0C is 32F. 100C is 212F. To convert F to C. 76F - 32F / 1.8 = 24.4C.  

I'm in Canada and have my thermostat controls purposely set to use F instead of C because it gives me more precise control over the ambient temperature. My previous thermostat used to let me program to tenths of a degree C, but this new one doesn't (round figures only) so I went the F route instead. It's set for 75F in the summer with a single 11pm to 6am overnight drop to 73F, then 71F in the winter with an 11-6 overnight drop to 68F. Works for me

October 20, 2020
4:29 am
Loonie
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There is a risk that if we all see the wisdom of going to Tiered, that electricity prices will shoot up more in future.

If I remember correctly, the Time of Use system was put in place to discourage people from using avoidable power at times when industry was needing it too. It was assumed individuals were more flexible. The idea was that Ontario would then be able to reduce the need to buy electricity from the US etc at peak prices because demand would be less at those times.

If we reverse this, it might end up costing more in future. I'm not sure how they arrived at the current prices that are on offer, but I won't be surprised if they go up right after the next provincial election, having proven unsustainable.

I've never been a fan of TOU because I think it discriminates against shift workers and others who need to be up in the expensive hours, plus the aggravation and stress of always having to time everything according to someone else's imposed schedule.
But I can see problems down the road with abandoning it.
I hope I'm wrong.

I set my thermostat at Fahrenheit too, for the same reason. As long as the US refuses to go metric, our thermostats are probably safe!sf-wink

October 20, 2020
6:25 am
topgun
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Londonguy said

I'm in Canada and have my thermostat controls purposely set to use F instead of C because it gives me more precise control over the ambient temperature. My previous thermostat used to let me program to tenths of a degree C, but this new one doesn't (round figures only) so I went the F route instead. It's set for 75F in the summer with a single 11pm to 6am overnight drop to 73F, then 71F in the winter with an 11-6 overnight drop to 68F. Works for me  

Your settings would work well. I bought my house 27 years ago. The reason to purchase a digital thermostat was to save heating costs. Mine has only F setting. I set the temperatures to be adjusted at different times of day.
Sometime in the last decade someone said Set temperature Leave it. Different thermostats work differently. The second floor is always colder in winter. Warmer in summer. If thermostat is set to 71F and 68F for winter the furnace is not turned on until the temperature drops one degree below the setting. Say temperature is 71F at 11. The furnace does not start until the temperature hits 67F. On a cold night the temperature keeps dropping. 63F is too cold. It takes hours to heat house to from 63 to 68. I like leaving temperature higher in winter to allow for this drop. Whether I leave temperature constant in the winter @68 or @75 I see no difference in the annual heating bill.

Have a Great Day

October 20, 2020
6:38 am
savemoresaveoften
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Loonie said
There is a risk that if we all see the wisdom of going to Tiered, that electricity prices will shoot up more in future.

If I remember correctly, the Time of Use system was put in place to discourage people from using avoidable power at times when industry was needing it too. It was assumed individuals were more flexible. The idea was that Ontario would then be able to reduce the need to buy electricity from the US etc at peak prices because demand would be less at those times.

If we reverse this, it might end up costing more in future. I'm not sure how they arrived at the current prices that are on offer, but I won't be surprised if they go up right after the next provincial election, having proven unsustainable.

I've never been a fan of TOU because I think it discriminates against shift workers and others who need to be up in the expensive hours, plus the aggravation and stress of always having to time everything according to someone else's imposed schedule.
But I can see problems down the road with abandoning it.
I hope I'm wrong.

I set my thermostat at Fahrenheit too, for the same reason. As long as the US refuses to go metric, our thermostats are probably safe!sf-wink  

I certainly hope that is not the case and the only reason they offer tiered pricing at the moment is due to Covid related work from home, which throws the TOU normal behavior out the door.

October 20, 2020
7:32 am
Londonguy
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topgun said

Your settings would work well. I bought my house 27 years ago. The reason to purchase a digital thermostat was to save heating costs. Mine has only F setting. I set the temperatures to be adjusted at different times of day.
Sometime in the last decade someone said Set temperature Leave it. Different thermostats work differently. The second floor is always colder in winter. Warmer in summer. If thermostat is set to 71F and 68F for winter the furnace is not turned on until the temperature drops one degree below the setting. Say temperature is 71F at 11. The furnace does not start until the temperature hits 67F. On a cold night the temperature keeps dropping. 63F is too cold. It takes hours to heat house to from 63 to 68. I like leaving temperature higher in winter to allow for this drop. Whether I leave temperature constant in the winter @68 or @75 I see no difference in the annual heating bill.  

In years gone by when I lived downtown in an older house (built in 1904) I had the same kind of temperature fluctuations you've described. A big PITA and difficult to manage. Fortunately for me the problem more or less disappeared since moving into newer construction. Residential HVAC, insulation materials & methods and air movement design systems are a lot better than they used to be.

Even in a newer home however there is still a need to tweak the air balancing. I find it helpful to open my basement air vents in winter, firstly to make it more tolerable but also to help warm the underside of the first floor. I don't mind it being a bit cooler upstairs as a result because I prefer that for sleeping. In high summer I close the same basement vents off, because that helps force more dry cooled air up through the duct work to the top floor to promote that overnight coolness. It's not perfect, but the general comfort level and temperature stability which results has the feel of being in a commercial office building

October 20, 2020
8:08 am
pooreva
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Londonguy said

I'm in Canada and have my thermostat controls purposely set to use F instead of C because it gives me more precise control over the ambient temperature. My previous thermostat used to let me program to tenths of a degree C, but this new one doesn't (round figures only) 

You are all correct regarding current thermometers being more accurate when switched to F instead of C. Reason is all thermometers are manufactured in USA and conversion to C is done as courtesy to us as we have metric system (like the rest of 'normal' world).
Current thermometers do round up temperature to the next integer number so it might be difficult to set it up to exact pleasant temperature. I did not come across thermometer showing temperature in C with 0.1 accuracy. If lucky you can get 0.5. Mine, with integer numbers, has 2 'steps' between 17 and 19C meaning from 17 it goes to 18 then another click again 18 and another click is 19. There is a difference between first and second 18 as internally it works in F.
Nevertheless, if F works for you - use it; just do not forget 40 speed limit in school zone is not 40 miles...

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