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Upgrade to Windows 11 ?
November 10, 2021
7:16 am
Winnie
Ontario
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I would like to get Linux with Firefox preinstalled. No other things needed at all. Very minimal Linux, very compact, that can be used directly from CD or USB and can be run on very old computer (1.5 GHz, 1 GB RAM). Where can I get that ?

November 10, 2021
11:24 am
RetirEd
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Winnie: Most distributions of Linux come with Firefox pre-installed. Ubuntu and Mint seem easiest to set up, for me. I use Ubuntu MATE, which is a sort of retro desktop (the underlying Os is the same as Ubuntu's other variants). You may like XUbuntu ir LUbuntu. There are other "lightweight" installs at ubuntu.com/download/flavours - and there's Puppy Linux, too.

(There are more Ubuntu flavour details at
wiki.ubuntu.com/UbuntuFlavors
but the list seems a bit out of date version-wise)

Note that even numbered Ubuntu xx.04 releases ate tagged LTS - long-term support. They generally get five years' support. There are three short-term support between LTS releases, and they are targeted at developers and those testing the Latest and Greatest. If you don't enjoy fooling around with your OS all the time, and want stability, stick to the LTS releases. The current one is 20.04 LTS; next will be 22.04 LTS.
RetirEd

November 11, 2021
9:59 am
Dean
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implode said

My hardware is too old to qualify, but it's still perfectly usable. i5 3570k with 32GB RAM and SSD. Wow, it's 3rd generation. Windows 11 wants 8th gen or newer.  

Unfortunately, this happens pretty much every time a new OS comes out. Older machines don't have enough Jam to run the new OS, and eventually have to be upgraded or replaced. At least Microsoft is giving 4 years notice, before they pull the plug on Windows 10.

When the next new Windows OS comes out (Windows 12?), I'll probably have to eventually replace my machine, as well.

Whether we like it or not, it's the; "C'est La Vie" of owning a computer. sf-wink

    Dean

sf-cool " Live Long And Prosper " sf-cool

November 12, 2021
7:50 am
Alexandre
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Dean said

Unfortunately, this happens pretty much every time a new OS comes out.

With Windows 11, it is different. Microsoft decided to make a lot of hardware obsolete, including their own. Not even very old hardware: Microsoft Surface Pro I bought 2 years ago new will not get Windows 11.

I expect Microsoft to either extend Windows 10 support for few more years, or loosen CPU restrictions a bit to allow people upgrade older versions of Microsoft own tablet.

The challenge with running Windows 10 after end of support is shown by Microsoft turning off OneDrive on Windows 7 computers just two years after Win 7 end of support.
That could mean no OneDrive on Windows 10 after 2027, and that is the real problem for Windows 10 users like me, who use free or paid versions of Microsoft cloud to store files.

November 12, 2021
7:58 am
COIN
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I'm still using Windows 7. So far so good.
I also used XP several years after.
I'm not a "power user". Might switch to Linux at some point soon.

November 12, 2021
8:30 am
pooreva
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Alexandre said
That could mean no OneDrive on Windows 10 after 2027, and that is the real problem for Windows 10 users like me, who use free or paid versions of Microsoft cloud to store files.  

Good luck to you if you trust Cloud...
I NEVER put ANY file anywhere out of my house particularly not to 'cloud'.

November 12, 2021
9:02 am
Alexandre
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pooreva said

Good luck to you if you trust Cloud...
I NEVER put ANY file anywhere out of my house particularly not to 'cloud'.  

Imagine that your computer disappears. It was there a moment ago, but now it is not. Gone and not reappearing back.
If you won't miss anything from that computer, you don't need to back anything from it to the cloud.

November 12, 2021
9:20 am
savemoresaveoften
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Alexandre said

Imagine that your computer disappears. It was there a moment ago, but now it is not. Gone and not reappearing back.
If you won't miss anything from that computer, you don't need to back anything from it to the cloud.  

+1
for personal use, very little to no reason to store ur data files on the cloud. just use a USB jump drive.
I only use cloud for storing pictures from my phone so it does not take up all the memory space.

November 12, 2021
10:02 am
Dean
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savemoresaveoften said

+1
for personal use, very little to no reason to store ur data files on the cloud. just use a USB jump drive.

. . . 

    Ditto ⬆

I don't use (or trust) The Cloud either. All my critical files are stored Off-computer, on two different sets of Encrypted USB 3.0 Flash Drives. One set is well hidden in our house, and the other back-up set is stored securely, off-premises.

It's not as convenient as The Cloud ... but the 'Comfort Factor' More than makes up for it.

My two centavos,

    Dean

sf-cool " Live Long And Prosper " sf-cool

November 12, 2021
11:44 am
Kidd
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The CLOUD.

I use the cloud, frequently (weekly). The purpose of the cloud was for multi party use NOT individual data storage, this was an after thought.

I have friends in Europe, we use the cloud for data transfer because emails have a file size limitation, the cloud doesn't.

The cloud was designed for multi party access and Covid has made the cloud more valuable than ever. Just say, you're working on a project. You post your results to the cloud for many co-workers to review, tweak or add their own input. Say i add the electrical, you in Germany add the mechanical, someone else adds the cost to implement and our project is complete.

YES. There are ownership issues. Microsoft for one, in the fine print. Our cloud service is ours, you are using it. We have the right to monitor whatever you post.

November 12, 2021
2:33 pm
Alexandre
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I would not suggest backing to the cloud self incriminating evidence, or something that might embarrass files owner if accessed by the third party. Perhaps, tax returns are to be kept offline, too.
Other than that, the cloud such as Microsoft OneDrive is one of valuable options for data backup and, just like Kidd said, for shared data access. Also, for data access on different computers with same user account.

All my critical files are stored Off-computer, on two different sets of Encrypted USB 3.0 Flash Drives. One set is well hidden in our house, and the other back-up set is stored securely, off-premises.

This is an option, too. Whatever works for you.

The main principle is to have on site backup and off site backup. As long as you value your data. The implementation of that principle is to anyone's preferences.

November 12, 2021
2:57 pm
pooreva
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Alexandre said

Imagine that your computer disappears. It was there a moment ago, but now it is not. Gone and not reappearing back.
If you won't miss anything from that computer, you don't need to back anything from it to the cloud.  

Imagine you get hit by the truck while crossing street. Nothing will matter anymore...

NO, I do NOT trust Cloud. Period. I make few backups on monthly basis and in case I have to leave house ASAP I just grab one of it and all my data is there.
I do not have to worry about hackers, lousy service, Cloud down, etc.
But everybody has its own way and I am Not going to argue with you. If it works for you, great, go ahead and continue your way.

November 12, 2021
3:18 pm
HermanH
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Anyone willing to use the cloud needs to know only one thing: assume that every single thing you place in the cloud is going to be read by someone else. I go a step further. Anything I transmit over the internet (supposedly) private or otherwise, I must assume is already stolen.

It would be naive to believe anything else.

November 12, 2021
7:36 pm
smayer97
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Alternative for cloud usage, either use a service where all data on the cloud storage is encrypted by the service (ideally where you alone hold the encryption key), or encrypted all data before loading it to the cloud, or both.

This takes a little extra effort to set up and use but it provides another layer or two of protection. It does not prevent your data from being stolen but does make it extremely hard to access.

November 12, 2021
7:36 pm
Kidd
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HermanH said
Anyone willing to use the cloud needs to know only one thing: assume that every single thing you place in the cloud is going to be read by someone else. I go a step further. Anything I transmit over the internet (supposedly) private or otherwise, I must assume is already stolen.

It would be naive to believe anything else.  

HermanH, is correct. The data you upload is scanned by a computer program, if your data is found to be questionable, it's flagged, then human eyes may take a look and make a decision. Keys words can activate a flag, copy right material, the age of the person in a photo may also raise a flag.

This i found very alarming. APPLE have the ability to scan their devices. They were going to do so, under the guise of... looking for child porn.

https://www.nbcnews.com/tech/apple/apple-delays-plans-scan-devices-child-sexual-abuse-images-n1278459

Talk about a loss of privacy. Whether you have questionable pictures on your device or not, the manufacturer SHOULD NOT be allowed to scan it without your consent or knowledge. (ADDED EDIT. The manufacturer should NOT have the ability to scan your device.)

As for the cloud, it is not something up in the sky, it's a data storing server (hard drive). I store my personal data on usb sticks and external ssd drives as others here have suggested.

I have had data on the cloud, flagged and removed due to what they considered to be, copy right infringement. If you share content with others, the cloud is a perfect way to do it.

November 13, 2021
2:04 am
RetirEd
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I'm with the never-any-cloud crew on this. I keep all my data on duplicate off-line devices and connect only one when using it; I use a non-connected computer to copy to the duplicates.

One can have off-site storage one controls oneself. I have long had my consulting clients make a free arrangement with another firm to trade lock-boxes of day-end backups every day. Some just do it every week, but nothing goes on the web and being in a different building avoids the whole-building-burning-down scenario. If one has regular shipping bags to satellite offices, or regular traveling staff, encrypted backups can be kept within the firm without worrying about lock-box break-ins.
RetirEd

November 13, 2021
7:04 am
COIN
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I think private personal pics of celebrities stored in the cloud have been hacked.

November 13, 2021
1:10 pm
mmlt
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I use the cloud sparingly. I archive and encrypt anything I don't want the rest of the world to see BEFORE I upload it. Like others I backup data to various external drives.
This doesn't help if the house burns down. Not a bad idea to pack an sd card in your wallet/purse with essential files.
I should mention Veracrypt. Excellent, cross platform encryption tool.

November 13, 2021
4:15 pm
Kidd
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You like your privacy? I have one for you.

Years ago, tv watchers were ASKED if they'd like to participate, it was called the Nelson ratings. It was how networks knew, who was watching what. Advertising revenue is/was based on viewers. 20,000 households watched leave to it beaver last night.

Now a days. You use the supplied Rogers tv box? Rogers know when "their" box is turned on, and what channel it was tuned to. 1 household (his mother's) watched Justin trudeau speak last night.

November 14, 2021
7:45 am
BlueSky
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Alexandre said

OneDrive on Windows 10 after 2027, and that is the real problem for Windows 10 users like me, who use free or paid versions of Microsoft cloud to store files.  

OneDrive is one of many cloud services out there, convenient mind you, as it is integrated onto Win. Explorer File System. However, Google Drive is another free cloud service that works seemlessly on a desktop. It does the job.

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