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phishing email? "Cheers to a rewarding 2023"
December 29, 2023
3:15 pm
rhvic
Victoria, BC
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Why am I getting an email from Neo Bank entitled "Cheers to a rewarding 2023" when I am not a customer of this bank? Anyone else getting this?

It starts:
"Andrew Chau here—CEO at Neo Financial.

As we approach the end of 2023, I wanted to take a moment to reflect on the remarkable year we've had at Neo and share our exciting plans for 2024. Our focus is on the future and, most importantly, on our customers.

The past year has been filled with milestones that have set the stage for ambitious initiatives in the coming year. These initiatives were designed with one goal in mind: to save Canadians time and money while providing a smarter, simpler financial experience. "

December 30, 2023
1:58 am
RetirEd
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rhvic: Are you perhaps a client of Neo's parent company or any of its derivatives, which would get you on their lists?

In any case, I'd suggest you be safe and call Neo's number obtained from another source (not the solicitation) and see if they sent it.

RetirEd

December 30, 2023
4:52 am
Jimmy
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I received the same email. I had an account, but closed it when their rates were 2.25% and uncompetitive at the time. When I closed the account they told me they would not allow me to reopen an account in the future now that they are competitive at 4%.

December 30, 2023
5:24 am
hwyc
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Is the term phishing used appropriately here?

December 30, 2023
5:54 am
Alexandre
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hwyc said
Is the term phishing used appropriately here?

That would be my question, too. If email does not ask for personal info, if it does not tell to call back by the phone number provided - it is just spam.
Deal with it like with any spam email: ignore and delete.

I am Neo client, recently opened their 4% HISA account in addition to other accounts I have with them, I haven't got that email.

December 30, 2023
6:22 am
The Rock
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I received that email because I have a credit card with them.

December 31, 2023
2:08 pm
rhvic
Victoria, BC
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I do not have accounts with Neo or any of their affiliates. My main concern is, where did they get my name and email from? They have no right to it. Who has sold it to them, or did they skim it from somewhere? Just wondering.

December 31, 2023
5:17 pm
Alexandre
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rhvic said
I do not have accounts with Neo or any of their affiliates. My main concern is, where did they get my name and email from? They have no right to it. Who has sold it to them, or did they skim it from somewhere? Just wondering.  

It is strange to get such email if you are not a customer, when not even all customers received it.

Neo Financial requires login by email address. Here is what you can do: open https://member.neofinancial.com/login in a browser and choose "Forgot your password?" New web page will open, asking you to enter email address to start password reset process.

Enter email address to which you received Neo "Cheers" email. If you will, indeed, get message from Neo to that email address with directions how to reset password for "your" account - you should be concerned.

December 31, 2023
9:53 pm
RetirEd
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Alexandre:

if it does not tell to call back by the phone number provided - it is just spam.

Is that what you meant to say? One should never try to verify a solicitation by the number or E-mail it provides, as that can be a fake.

Always use a contact taken directly from the institution, by web site, phone directory or your own correspondence.

RetirEd

January 2, 2024
9:22 am
TINAisOver
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Alexandre said

hwyc said
Is the term phishing used appropriately here?

That would be my question, too. If email does not ask for personal info, if it does not tell to call back by the phone number provided - it is just spam.
Deal with it like with any spam email: ignore and delete.

I am Neo client, recently opened their 4% HISA account in addition to other accounts I have with them, I haven't got that email.  

This may not even qualify as spam since if there is / was a previous biz relationship, I would call it market/ advertising.

Alexandre said

It is strange to get such email if you are not a customer, when not even all customers received it.

Neo Financial requires login by email address. Here is what you can do: open https://member.neofinancial.com/login in a browser and choose "Forgot your password?" New web page will open, asking you to enter email address to start password reset process.

Enter email address to which you received Neo "Cheers" email. If you will, indeed, get message from Neo to that email address with directions how to reset password for "your" account - you should be concerned.  

I too find it odd to receive this email without any connection to Neo.

Alexandre 's reverse account lookup is brilliant . LOL

Most likely rhvic's email address somehow found its way to Neo's marketing / adv. list and not from an account created at Neo using that exact email address . Definitely worth a try with nothing to lose and if you do get a hit then its more than a concern.

RetirEd said
Alexandre:

if it does not tell to call back by the phone number provided - it is just spam.

Is that what you meant to say? One should never try to verify a solicitation by the number or E-mail it provides, as that can be a fake.

Always use a contact taken directly from the institution, by web site, phone directory or your own correspondence.  

Although Alexandre did not mention the step to lookup the account using the email address directly on Neo's website, I consider it a given and I never thought otherwise . A good mention for clarification.

Trader first, Saver second

January 2, 2024
11:54 am
althisa
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rhvic said
I do not have accounts with Neo or any of their affiliates. My main concern is, where did they get my name and email from? They have no right to it. Who has sold it to them, or did they skim it from somewhere? Just wondering.  

Unfortunately there is no restriction on any FI purchasing your email from thousands of data brokers who will offer it along with data about your income, how many accounts you have etc. The data broker industry is a $200 BILLION industry for a reason:
https://www.maximizemarketresearch.com/market-report/global-data-broker-market/55670/

You could have provided you email for a points card, a draw, or even a newsletter signup. That data point can be combined with other data available about you and sold without your knowledge, completely legally by a valid business.

See parallel discussion on this forum here, starting at post #33
https://www.highinterestsavings.ca/forum/your-stories/inflation-2023-reflected-in-my-household-expenses/page-2/

AFAIK in Canada no consent required for first email sent to you. But if you explicitly opt out or inform them in writing you dont want any more emails, the (single) institution you did inform cant send you more unsolicited emails.

January 23, 2024
1:16 am
RetirEd
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I always advise that everyone should keep a supply of fake E-mail identities, and use them for website logins when veracity is not essential. (i.e., not banking!)

Then they can limit data transfer AND identify who leaked data by where it turns up.

RetirEd

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