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Morningstar: History’s Lessons for the Post-Pandemic World
January 29, 2021
5:02 pm
Norman1
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Interesting article about the long term economic effects of the COVID pandemic:

Morningstar.ca (Sept 2020): History’s Lessons for the Post-Pandemic World

January 29, 2021
7:18 pm
Bill
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I agree with the article, no or small impact is the usual response. When this is over, people are going to party, travel, go out dining and entertainment, etc like mad immediately to make up for lost time, we'll be so happy to be back to our normal consumer society asap, is my bet.

January 30, 2021
1:48 am
Kidd
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This time, it might be different.

After WW 2, the people rejoiced, there was stimulus, a lot to rebuild. We moved forward, we prospered, communities, subdivisions were built which created demand, jobs and services. A need was filled and the people (us) shared in the wealth.

911, was a local event with global consequences. Yes, air travel resumed but our rights and freedoms were lost and big brother government will never give those rights back. The word "terrorism" became a catch word with no meaning. In the name of "terrorism" we the government are... "Coward" is another word used by the police and government. "Injustice and desperation" are the words I'd use in 99.9% of these situations but that would focus the blame.

The lone word "terrorism" created unimaginable wealth for the select elite, at the expense of the normal working day stiff (us). Prosperity was not shared by the people, for the people.

Covid... viruses. China is viewed as being a backwards nation but they will strive, advance. They will beat covid, we will NOT.

The Governments of the "so called" free world have focused our attention elsewhere for many years, so that they can pick our pockets clean. Using words like "terrorism" "communism" "patriotism" their greed as emptied the cupboard. There is NO stimulus left to be spent, we as a people have given, we have borrowed all that we can borrow. Now our government's are going to increase taxes as a way to get revenue.

Using Canada as my example. We as a country, should be one of the richest nations in the world. We have an abundance of resources, from oil, fresh water to lumber. What's holding us back... the morons running this country. We can not refine oil, we can not make a vaccine. Me myself, coming from a background in the auto industry, canada can not make their own car. The past government of Ontario, sold a lake full of water to a bottle company for two dollars, and our leader (she) honestly believed "we" the tax payer got a great deal.

Canada needs... accountability, we need to clean house, we need 50% less government. The likes of Julie Payette shouldn't get a pension, she should be in jail.

January 30, 2021
2:20 am
Kidd
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Proof link. The Ontario government was charging nestle $3.71 for every MILLION litres of fresh water they took. Have you ever bought a bottle of water? How much did that bottle of water cost you?

https://www.ctvnews.ca/business/activists-urge-ontario-government-to-refuse-nestle-a-water-taking-permit-1.3037419?cache=yes%3FclipId%3D89531

January 30, 2021
4:58 am
Loonie
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I have my own ideas, but I can't say what is going to happen. Those who can still afford it will likely spend a lot on vacations, entertainment, restaurants, clothes to be seen in, and private services.

I can say with confidence though that this is a very poor piece of history writing and need not be taken more seriously than the fluff piece that it is. It is so flawed that it would take me a whole chapter to go through it and I'm not willing to take the time.
The guy is a fresh-faced young Arkansan with a BA in economics and an MBA. He is termed an "analyst", which is something akin to a crystal ball gazer from what I can tell of others with the same moniker.
By their own admission, they all missed 2008-09 rolling down the hill towards them.

He is not a historian, and this short essay does not pass muster . I'd place it at about the grade 10 or 11 level, with points for creativity; zero for considering multiplicity of factors.

No need to take this seriously or worry about it.

Kidd has made some excellent points. Where I may differ is in the role of the state. Just because they're doing a crappy job doesn't mean we don't need them to do a job. There are many things that only the state can do or that they are best positioned to do. It's up to us to make sure they do it. Undermining it only makes it worse. We can only do that if we maintain a healthy and lively democracy where people have access to good education, freedom of the press, and an engaged citizenry. The alternative is much much worse.

January 30, 2021
8:18 am
Bill
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Kidd, I've got no idea what you're talking about, the way we live today compared to 50 years ago is WAY more lavish than all those hard-working post-WWII folks. I do agree we've got too much gov't, but the Canadian voters consistently vote for bigger gov't so you and I are out of sync with the times, I guess.

January 30, 2021
9:16 am
Oscar
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There are many groups that are working on the the way things are to be in the post-pandemic world and although much of this is discussed openly there doesn't seem to be any serious reporting by our free press and so many people are unaware of these things.
Have you heard our government explaining this:
https://www.unpacampaign.org/ https://en.unpacampaign.org/news/

What about the coverage of the great reset. Is everyone up to speed on this ?
https://www.weforum.org/great-reset/
https://pm.gc.ca/en/news/readouts/2020/06/11/prime-minister-trudeau-speaks-his-royal-highness-prince-wales-and
https://www.imf.org/en/News/Articles/2020/06/03/sp060320-remarks-to-world-economic-forum-the-great-reset
https://agenda21news.com/2015/05/australian-prime-ministers-top-advisor-climate-change-about-a-new-world-order-under-the-control-of-the-un/
https://www.weforum.org/events/the-davos-agenda-2021

January 30, 2021
9:24 am
Kidd
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Hi Bill,

The lavish lifestyle of today is brought to you by credit. 50 years ago, we had a cash only society. I can not quote you the Canadian debt ratio off the top of my head but it's extremely HIGH.

I believe my statements in post 3 are correct.

Is our standard of living higher today than it was... in most cases, YES. But the homeless and the food bank recipient's may say otherwise. My job paid an amazing income, I was very lucky. Today's youth may not, will not be so lucky. They need a desired skill set and those are hard to come by.

January 30, 2021
9:36 am
Kidd
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Oscar, i was kind of hoping that was one (1) big long link. It's not.

I will look at your links, but in most cases it's opinion. To survive we need to... Whenever i read the words "they say". I always ask myself who the F is "they"?

January 30, 2021
10:25 am
Norman1
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As well, people can see through that opportunism by political organizations like the UN. Just like people can see through the opportunism from Rogers, Bell, Telus, and Shaw trying to sell upgrades to fibre internet right now as people are working from home.

I'm certainly not interested in having and funding a new layer of politicians at a toothless UN parliament that would require another kind of election. That would be another election in addition to the municipal, school board, provincial, and federal elections we already have.

A new UN parliament will be toothless just like the rest of the UN. That's why the World Health Organization has acted the way it has. The WHO actually has no legal authority. If it didn't play kind of nice with China, China, along with any other country, can just brush them off and refuse access to WHO scientists who wish to visit Wuhan to study the origins of the COVID-19 virus.

There is also the question of funding for those "Great Reset" ideas. Canada has borrowed a lot of money to support individual Canadians and Canadian businesses affected by the COVID-19 lockdowns and restrictions. There isn't going to be much support for spending some of that borrowed money in Africa, for example, while Canada is still dealing with its own COVID-19 effects.

January 30, 2021
11:17 am
Norman1
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Kidd said

Is our standard of living higher today than it was... in most cases, YES. But the homeless and the food bank recipient's may say otherwise. My job paid an amazing income, I was very lucky. Today's youth may not, will not be so lucky. They need a desired skill set and those are hard to come by.

The homeless and food bank recipients have never done well. Before and after the internet came along. That will still be the case after the pandemic.

That's was decades ago when employers could not hold out for someone who had the desired skills. There just wasn't enough qualified people period.

In the 1980's, Royal Bank would hire anyone with a university degree to be a teller. It didn't matter what the bachelor degree was in: Archaeology, history, recreation, basket weaving, …! The new hire was sent to an internal Royal Bank institute for six months for the training required.

That's not the case today. Too many qualified people floating around looking for work compared to the desired jobs available. Skills required for the well paying but unfilled positions take way more than six months of training.

January 30, 2021
11:18 am
Oscar
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Why is our deputy prime minister on their board of trustees ? Nothing to do at home ?
https://www.weforum.org/about/leadership-and-governance

January 30, 2021
11:23 am
Norman1
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Oscar said
Why is our deputy prime minister on their board of trustees ? Nothing to do at home ?
https://www.weforum.org/about/leadership-and-governance

There's always time for resume padding!

Would this look good on your resume:

  • Oscar, Board Trustee (2018 - 2021), World Economic Forum (Davos, Switzerland)sf-smile
January 30, 2021
11:31 am
Oscar
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Not if you're the top politician of a supposedly democratic country , in my opinion.
Remember who they are : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bilderberg_meeting

January 30, 2021
12:03 pm
Dean
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Bill said

. . . When this is over, people are going to party, travel, go out dining and entertainment, etc like mad immediately to make up for lost time, we'll be so happy to be back to our normal consumer society asap, is my bet.  

At least partially True ... time will tell.

But it won't happen all at once, and many parts of the world (e.g. USofA & Canada) will still be struggling with the effects of Covid, well into 2022.

We're still a long way from 'Party Time'
.

      Dean

sf-cool " Live Long And Prosper " sf-cool

January 30, 2021
1:20 pm
Norman1
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I don't think we need to worry about the demise of partying. People are trying to party now, before it is safe to do so.

Same with vacationing in other warmer countries. We've had people, like former Ontario Finance Minister Rod Phillips and former Ontario hospital CEO Dr. Tom Stewart, who ought to have known better. sf-frown

Yes, it will be a while before things return to normal. The situation in 2008 took years to recover from. Right now, there are some challenges in manufacturing and distributing the COVID-19 vaccine. Once those are overcome, we could find that a significant number of people refuse the vaccine for various reasons.

January 30, 2021
2:42 pm
Dean
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Dean said

. . .

. . . and many parts of the world (e.g. USofA & Canada) will still be struggling with the effects of Covid, well into 2022.

. . .   

And we can add the EU to that 2022 list, as well . . .

    Dean

sf-cool " Live Long And Prosper " sf-cool

January 30, 2021
4:06 pm
Bill
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Few more months , we'll be back to full party mode. Soon as old folks are vaccinated the hospital load will drop dramatically, should be soon, then it's done.

U.K. went from zero to 100 in getting up domestic vaccine production facilities in the last few months, apparently too hard for Canadians to figure out.

Talking about seeing through Bell, etc, I just upgraded to fibe internet yesterday, for about $8 - 12 more per month, not promo price, guy gave me a deal. Grandkids wanted to start skyping, needed more megabytes or whatever they are.

January 30, 2021
7:28 pm
Loonie
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It will be interesting to see how effective the vaccines are in practice for the elderly. The research I read on Moderna posted at CDC only showed a breakdown for age group 65-95, which covers a lot of territory, and there weren't likely too many at the upper end.

My mother's retirement home residents received first shot of Moderna in early January. I realize this is not full immunity yet but is said to provide some. Three weeks later there were 3 residents with positive test results (about 3% of the resident population), more than they've had among residents in previous outbreaks. It's not enough to be statistically significant, but neither is it all that reassuring.

I'm not saying they can't work or won't work and I don't support any conspiracy theories. Just reporting in anecdotally from the front lines.

January 30, 2021
8:38 pm
Norman1
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Those unfortunate infections are not surprising.

There isn't much protection during the first 14 days after the first shot. Those 90%+ efficacy numbers one sees are from 14 days after the second shot.

Page 28 of the FDA briefing document for the Moderna vaccine indicate around 50% efficacy over the 14 days after the first shot.

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