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Fido or Rogers Master card? Can't decide!
March 22, 2018
9:56 pm
Loonie
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I would always travel with at least one Visa and one MC in case one or the other system goes down. Even a temporary glitch can be a huge hassle while travelling. I like to have one from a "big bank" with me as they have better overseas connections. Perhaps the latter isn't as important now, but it has helped me out in the past. Also, our oldest cards, the ones with the biggest credit limits, are from the big banks.

March 22, 2018
10:53 pm
Norman1
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Save2Retire@55 said

Yes, PC still needs that and they don't have an online option ... so have to call in and wait 30+ minutes to talk to someone and also make sure they put the right countries and dates. I think the more advanced the system gets, the better it learns of the card owner's behavior and adjusts its alarms.  

I've submitted travel advisories to PC Financial MasterCard many times through their account web site.

After signing in, click on Services in the left sidebar to go to the page of services. The Make An Account Request section of the page has a link to the travel advisory submission page:

Make An Account Request
Add Authorized User
Dispute Transaction
Travel Advisory
Credit Limit Change
Request Convenience Cheques

March 23, 2018
4:42 pm
Save2Retire@55
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Norman1 said

I've submitted travel advisories to PC Financial MasterCard many times through their account web site.

After signing in, click on Services in the left sidebar to go to the page of services. The Make An Account Request section of the page has a link to the travel advisory submission page:

Make An Account Request
Add Authorized User
Dispute Transaction
Travel Advisory
Credit Limit Change
Request Convenience Cheques

  

This is so funny that I have never seen it before and even last time I asked the agent about how to make this request easier. Very happy to see it there. Thanks

March 23, 2018
7:35 pm
Norman1
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Rick said

Thanx for the numbers. Still not feelin it though. I'd love to get 1.42% of all the credit card transactions, even for just a day. Imagine it pales in comparison to what they bring in on interest and fees.  

Most cards now have some kind of reward cashback, miles, or points. So, most of that 1.42% is not kept.

The Home Trust Preferred Visa we have been talking about has a 1% cash back. That cash back will eat up 1%/1.42% = 70.4% of the 1.42%. That will eat up 1%/1.23% = 81.3% of the 1.23% from food and grocery store purchases.

I think it used to be quite profitable when the Canadian market was not as saturated. Interchange rates used to be higher. Rewards programs were uncommon. Cardholders thought they were lucky if they escaped an annual fee for their Visa credit card.

March 23, 2018
7:43 pm
Norman1
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Mary said

They can sort of. We booked a hotel in Oregon from another hotel in same city over the phone. It appears that the new hotel had issues and our card number was now public information and was duplicated and being used 5 states away. … Also were told they test the new forged card by buying a chocolate bar at a gas station. Master Card must have algorithms running to pick up that type of thing.  

Card number, expiry date, and CVV code are not enough to create a working duplicate card. There is a validation code on the magnetic stripe that is also needed.

It may have been the old hotel where the card was run through a card terminal that was compromised.

March 23, 2018
8:05 pm
Norman1
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Mary said
I never use TAP either. What is the safest...magnetic strip....tap....or chip?? Is there not a limit for TAP....not over $100? And who picks up the fraudulent TAP the vendor or VISA? TAP cards have )))) on them.

According to Visa Canada: Improve your customers' experience with Visa payWave, the Visa card issuer is liable for the fraudulent TAP:

Built-in encryption technology, which translates the data from every Visa payWave transaction into a unique code that can only be used once. This protects each and every transaction, as well as your customer’s personal information.

Visa’s Zero Liability Promise,4 which ensures cardholders will not be held responsible for any fraudulent purchases.

As the merchant, you also have the benefit of liability protection for transactions up to $100 because chargeback from lost, stolen or counterfeit cards do not apply. You’re protected and so are your customers.

4 Based on Canada issued cards Visa cardholders must establish that the transaction is not their responsibility as per all applicable agreements of the issuing financial institution, including protecting their PIN where applicable. Visa Purchasing, Visa Corporate, and Visa Commercial Cards are excluded from the program. For complete details see http://www.visa.ca.

March 24, 2018
5:04 am
Top It Up
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Rick said

I've heard tap is safer as you don't run the risk of having your info skimmed from a compromised terminal. Down side is there is a limit, and you should keep in a RFI blocking wallet.   

"Down side is there is a limit" - where's the downside, you already have the physical card in your hand - in Canada, generally, contactless pay is limited to $100 - purchases over that amount require a PIN. Realistically what percentage of your everyday purchases are under / over the $100 limit.

"... you should keep in a RFI blocking wallet" - absolute, unequivocal BS perpetrated by an RFID "protection" industry - where there's nothing to protect - and plays on the gullible with reams, upon reams of FUD.

March 24, 2018
8:42 am
Kidd
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A Canadian phenomena.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.2561676

Over the last few years, Canadian banks (credit cards), like ALL of the Canadian travel insurance companies are finding ways out of paying for rightful claims. I am aware of at least half dozen cases, where a bank has NOT covered a theft on a credit card. Please read the links that i have posted here.

https://globalnews.ca/news/3227050/lost-your-credit-card-some-canadian-banks-may-hold-you-fully-liable/

If only our government worked for the people...

https://globalnews.ca/news/4064117/counterfeit-toronto-raptors-jersey-foot-locker/

Even big business in canada is now doing it to us. Was footlocker held accountable for selling counterfeit NIKE goods at full retail price? NO. They secretly gave the money back, admitted no guilt, case closed. The police, the government were not involved.

What has canada become?

March 24, 2018
9:02 am
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Kidd said

...I am aware of at least half dozen cases, where a bank has NOT covered a theft on a credit card.  

I tell ya', I agree with you fully, ALMOST - where I do stray, a bit, from your comments is the difference between when people lose their credit / debit cards through their OWN absolute carelessness and stupidity AND someone getting their credit / debit card number ripped off, unsuspectingly, by a POS skimmer or some criminal "working" as a night clerk at a hotel in Italy, scraping numbers submitted as part of the reservation requirement.

Hell, you don't have to go to that extreme - I can't tell you how many times I have seen people ahead of me, in grocery checkout lines, with their PIN numbers scotch taped to their cards - yeah, that'll work.

March 24, 2018
10:48 am
Norman1
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Kidd said
A Canadian phenomena.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/.....-1.2561676

Over the last few years, Canadian banks (credit cards), like ALL of the Canadian travel insurance companies are finding ways out of paying for rightful claims. I am aware of at least half dozen cases, where a bank has NOT covered a theft on a credit card. Please read the links that i have posted here.

https://globalnews.ca/news/3227050/lost-your-credit-card-some-canadian-banks-may-hold-you-fully-liable/

If only our government worked for the people...

https://globalnews.ca/news/4064117/counterfeit-toronto-raptors-jersey-foot-locker/

Even big business in canada is now doing it to us. Was footlocker held accountable for selling counterfeit NIKE goods at full retail price? NO. They secretly gave the money back, admitted no guilt, case closed. The police, the government were not involved.

What has canada become?  

Canada has become a nation where people uncritically jump to conclusions based on sloppy journalism.

Footlocker and the counterfeit Nike jersey. Some people will knowing buy high quality counterfeits at a low price from a shady dealer. They will then buy the same authentic item from stores, like Footlocker and Best Buy, that have a generous return policy. Afterwards, they will return their counterfeit items to the stores!

If the counterfeits are really good, the store staff won't be able to tell and put it back on the shelf.

The retailer is a victim as much as the later customer who ends up buying the counterfeit item.

The disputed $81,276 charge on a CIBC Visa for "a custom-built race car" is suspect. Chip-and-PIN card was used. Customer says his Visa card "was neither lost, stolen nor did he divulge his PIN to anyone."

Chip cards are not easily cloned. I read about the European cases. Reporter is sloppy and left out the highly-significant fact the European chip-and-PIN fraud cases involve original chip-and-PIN cards that are stolen and then modified by the crooks.

I suspect that his Visa card was actually used. Maybe not by him but by someone else in his household who was able to put the card back in his wallet.

The obvious PIN case. Under some the agreements I've read, I don't have a valid claim against the bank if I pick an obvious PIN. People need to take some responsibility.

There was a similar case years ago where bank refused full compensation. Bank said correct PIN was used on first attempt on the ATM withdrawal. No sign of fraud before card was reported lost. Complaint was escalated to Banking Ombudsman who then investigated.

The full story was that the customer met a woman the night before who he didn't previously know. Woman was invited back to his place and they spent the night together. When he woke up the next morning, the woman and his wallet were gone!

Woman had locked out one bank card trying to guess his PIN. But, she was able to guess his PIN before the second card was locked out. He had used the same PIN on all his cards. So, the correct PIN was used on the first attempt on the other cards!

Bank offered partial compensation because it felt he contributed to his losses by picking an obvious PIN. Obviously, not that secure if some woman, whom he had known for less than 24 hours, could have guess the PIN!sf-laugh

March 24, 2018
1:57 pm
Bill
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Norman1: "Canada has become a nation where people uncritically jump to conclusions based on sloppy journalism."

VERY true, though maybe not so much sloppy as much as ideologically a nice fit with the current, clichéd, obligatory, pop culture narrative, i.e. the innocent, victimized individual vs the greedy, corrupt corporation/government. I'm always pleasantly surprised when I hear that someone else is willing to pay the cost of my very own credit card being used fraudulently, I've always thought that's pretty nice of them.

March 24, 2018
6:26 pm
Norman1
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Bill said
… I'm always pleasantly surprised when I hear that someone else is willing to pay the cost of my very own credit card being used fraudulently, I've always thought that's pretty nice of them.

The card issuers are quite willing to cover an innocent cardholder's losses. Used to be cardholder was legally on the hook for the first $50 of the fraudulent charges. But, that was not applied when it was obvious the cardholder was not complicit or negligent.

That's the challenge. Sometimes, it looks like the cardholder is complicit or negligent. For example, those unauthorized monthly charges for a cancelled gym membership that were, for some reason, not disputed for years, until the cardholder saw a news story.

Another example was a TD Bank customer who tried to disavow quite a few ATM cash withdrawals as fraudulent. Customer claimed that someone must have cracked TD Bank's card and PIN security. He still had his Green Card and he could prove he was at home at the times of the withdrawals.

Customer was invited to drop by the bank branch to meet with the manager. There, he was shown the ATM camera video for one of the "unauthorized" withdrawals and was asked if he recognized the person using his bank card. It was one of his children!

He withdrew his complaints after the manager offered to contact the police.

March 25, 2018
9:20 am
Save2Retire@55
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I had fraudulent charges on my Amazon Visa card just 3 weeks ago. We traveled to the Caribbean (Aruba) in December and I had to use the card ONLY once in Dominos Pizza (It was the night of landing and I still didn't have cash nor USD). Anyhow, that was that. I used my PIN and paid. Below might be related to that usage or not. I will never know.

3 months later I get a call from Chase asking me for some suspicious charges. One was a $90 charge for a McDonald order. I said I have never been to McDonald in the past 5 years! There was another charge which I wasn't aware of. Both were done without the usage of the PIN. They couldn't tell the source / location the charges were made from.

The point, they were the ones who called me about these charges which they cancelled immediately without any more questions or investigations.

Amazon - I will miss you!

March 25, 2018
9:40 am
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Save2Retire@55 said
I had fraudulent charges on my Amazon Visa card just 3 weeks ago. ... Both were done without the usage of the PIN. They couldn't tell the source / location the charges were made from.  

SORRY ... something suspicious about the "They couldn't tell the source / location the charges were made from."

REALLY ... Chase gets a ping, approves the ping, YET doesn't know the merchant location????

March 25, 2018
10:12 am
Norman1
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Save2Retire@55 said

3 months later I get a call from Chase asking me for some suspicious charges. One was a $90 charge for a McDonald order. I said I have never been to McDonald in the past 5 years! There was another charge which I wasn't aware of. Both were done without the usage of the PIN. They couldn't tell the source / location the charges were made from.

The point, they were the ones who called me about these charges which they cancelled immediately without any more questions or investigations.

Amazon - I will miss you!  

I think most of the card issuers monitor for suspicious activity. I know that BMO does.

I had a false positive when I was declined at a gas station. Paid with another credit card and called them later asking what was up.

It was the card's second use at that gas station that day. They said it looked suspicious. I told them it was me both times. Bought a bit of gas early in the day. In the evening, price had dropped dramatically and I filled up my tank at the same station. I guess BMO thought the attendant may have skimmed the card earlier in the day and was now trying to use the skimmed info.

The next time was actual fraudulent use. A voicemail was left that my card had been locked down. Only chip-and-PIN transactions would be approved. The callback number was suspicious. Called the number on my credit card instead.

BMO confirmed the voicemail was authentic and from their fraud department. Agent asked if I was in some city, that I didn't recognize, in the US the day before. I said no. My card was cancelled immediately. Agent said a replacement should arrive in about a week or so.

March 25, 2018
3:47 pm
Save2Retire@55
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Top It Up said

Save2Retire@55 said
I had fraudulent charges on my Amazon Visa card just 3 weeks ago. ... Both were done without the usage of the PIN. They couldn't tell the source / location the charges were made from.  

SORRY ... something suspicious about the "They couldn't tell the source / location the charges were made from."

REALLY ... Chase gets a ping, approves the ping, YET doesn't know the merchant location????  

Yup. I told them the same. Their answer was that the purchase was made online yet without a PIN! I have no idea how that can even be possible. I didn't even see those purchases on my account LOL. They right away cancelled that card and sent me a new one to be used for the final 2 weeks of Amazon Visa CC's life.

March 25, 2018
4:23 pm
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Save2Retire@55 said

Yup. I told them the same. Their answer was that the purchase was made online yet without a PIN! I have no idea how that can even be possible. I didn't even see those purchases on my account LOL. They right away cancelled that card and sent me a new one to be used for the final 2 weeks of Amazon Visa CC's life.  

Have to say I'm pretty happy to be dealing with REAL financial institutions rather than fly-by-night products like Amazon VISA.

THIS is what happens at CIBC when they are unsure about a transaction - they immediately send a Text Message to the CC holder -

We declined a txn of $63.18 at ---------- on VISA card ending in XXXX. If recognized type Y, otherwise type N.

Y

Thanks for verifying this purchase attempt. Please try your purchase again. This alert was sent by CIBC to protect you

March 25, 2018
4:30 pm
Peter
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Closing this thread as it has gone too far off topic. Feel free to open new threads to discuss any other credit card choices or any expand upon any of the other topics in this discussion.

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