RBC GIC for RRSP | Page 2 | GIC discussions | Discussion forum

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

No permission to create posts
sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
RBC GIC for RRSP
September 1, 2020
7:58 pm
Loonie
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 6406
Member Since:
October 21, 2013
sp_UserOnlineSmall Online

To answer your question, you need to do the math. I'm not sure why you are not doing it. It sounds like you don't really want to be bothered with moving the money. Your choice.

RBC: 17K, at 1%, compounded annually x 18 months = approx 17,255.
Oaken: 17K at 1.95%, compounded annually x 18 months = approx 17,500.

Even after you deduct the transfer fee that RBC charges, you will be about $200 ahead at Oaken. If that doesn't matter to you, then so be it.

I think you are too concerned about the fee. It's the cost of doing business with RBC, which is never going to pay you a great rate.

I would ask RBC if there is a fee for closing your RSP, which you appear to be intending to do at the end of this next term. I looked in vain for a list of their fees online, but it's quite possible they will charge you $50 or more for that too, making it unavoidable. I was charged an outrageous $100 to close a similar RSP at National Bank a few years ago. Remember too that these fees will very likely increase.

I have had some very bad experiences with RBC lately and would not give them a penny of my business. That's my bias. This is reinforced when I find them hiding their fee schedule.

September 2, 2020
5:44 am
savemoresaveoften
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 355
Member Since:
March 30, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

if it was me, I would just do the math and find out the answer to all the questions being asked here. Those are pretty straight forward to find out. But then its easier to just ask....sigh... Its your money so should spend some time urself... Thats what I teach my kids. In the days of google, there is really no reason to ask someone for a simple answer that can be found readily.

September 2, 2020
7:24 am
dwdrajesh
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 30
Member Since:
April 18, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Thanks again guys. I am not trying to get an easy answer by just asking people online, I do the math myself carefully anyways before I sign up to something. However, since I already have one RBC account, one EQ Bank, one Tangerine , I was just asking how much of a hassle it is to transfer RRSP to Oaken, let's say, by first opening a new account and then going through all the procedures for 0.65% for the money that I have (around 17k). Did you guys have a good experience with Oaken so far? I live in a city where they don't have a local office though. Thanks again guys, I really appreciate it.

September 2, 2020
7:49 am
savemoresaveoften
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 355
Member Since:
March 30, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

dwdrajesh said
Thanks again guys. I am not trying to get an easy answer by just asking people online, I do the math myself carefully anyways before I sign up to something. However, since I already have one RBC account, one EQ Bank, one Tangerine , I was just asking how much of a hassle it is to transfer RRSP to Oaken, let's say, by first opening a new account and then going through all the procedures for 0.65% for the money that I have (around 17k). Did you guys have a good experience with Oaken so far? I live in a city where they don't have a local office though. Thanks again guys, I really appreciate it.  

I have account with Oaken from more than 6+ years ago. Other than opening the account which I did at their office, everything else is done online or via the phone. Their services are fine and I have no issues with them. Like the fact I can set GIC maturity instructions and purchase GIC online easily too.
Oaken is Home bank and Home Trust, the 2 are separate entity. If you get GIC, you can put up to $100k in each name so $200k CDIC protection.

September 2, 2020
12:27 pm
dwdrajesh
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 30
Member Since:
April 18, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Hi guys, just a quick question since I am a bit new to the Canadian credit system and I dont own a house but plan on buying one in the next 2-2.5 years. I have been with RBC for sometime and I have heard people say that if you have a good history (in terms of credit, deposit, etc), later when you plan to get a house, the bank might offer you some concession on the interest rates. I looked up online but there is so much information to filter out. Do you think it is a wise decision to stick with one bank with whom you have a good history rather than having multiple accounts on different banks? Thanks again.

September 2, 2020
12:38 pm
Alexandre
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 224
Member Since:
November 8, 2018
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

dwdrajesh said
Hi guys, just a quick question since I am a bit new to the Canadian credit system and I dont own a house but plan on buying one in the next 2-2.5 years. I have been with RBC for sometime and I have heard people say that if you have a good history (in terms of credit, deposit, etc), later when you plan to get a house, the bank might offer you some concession on the interest rates. I looked up online but there is so much information to filter out. Do you think it is a wise decision to stick with one bank with whom you have a good history rather than having multiple accounts on different banks? Thanks again.  

I suggest you start with checking your current credit score, which you can do for free with your RBC account. Login to their Web site, see "Accounts Summary" page and at the right bottom side there is "My Services" section where you'll find "View Your Credit Score."

Perhaps, you credit score is already good enough, then don't worry about doing anything else.

September 2, 2020
12:51 pm
dwdrajesh
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 30
Member Since:
April 18, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Thanks, mine shows 41-60% in the chart. I was thinking more about the promotional offers they give to clients for loans who have been with them for some time. I have been with them for 6 years though. Thanks

September 2, 2020
3:11 pm
Loonie
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 6406
Member Since:
October 21, 2013
sp_UserOnlineSmall Online

Banks have no loyalty to their customers unless they are very wealthy. If perchance they give you a good deal at some point, it will be because of market conditions, your creditworthiness, your potential as a future customer and your ability to negotiate. They may SAY that it's because you've been a good customer, but that's BS. They would be equally eager to get a NEW customer or reclaim one who has strayed.

You keep finding new reasons why you can't move forward with transferring your GIC. Meanwhile, the rates are falling. You are losing money while you dither.

It's irrelevant that you have accounts with other financial institutions. What you want is the best possible deal. Promos effectively don't exist right now in GICs. If it bothers you to have accounts at several institutions, then dump RBC and Tangerine as soon as you can.
Oaken is a keeper if you plan on having GICs in the future.
As you will see on another thread, Oaken is lowering its rates next Wednesday and has given notice about this. If you hurry, they might agree to hold the current rate for your transfer. Don't waste any more time. It's not the difference in percentage points per se that matters; it's the dollars that it translates into.

September 2, 2020
3:28 pm
Rick
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 974
Member Since:
February 17, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

With rates like these:RBC-GIC.jpgrbc.jpg
I fail to understand why anybody, especially those that frequent this forum, would have anything to do with RBC

September 2, 2020
3:51 pm
Londonguy
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 447
Member Since:
May 27, 2016
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

dwdrajesh said
Do you think it is a wise decision to stick with one bank with whom you have a good history rather than having multiple accounts on different banks? Thanks again.  

IMO the answer is "absolutely not".

First you should read about something that happened to me in my younger days, because it's an illustration of how I was abruptly reminded that the bank (any bank) is not my friend -- https://www.highinterestsavings.ca/forum/general-financial-discussion/bmo-300-promotion-for-opening-a-chequing-account/#p55301

Since that early incident there have been at least 3 more occasions in my life when I would have been at a serious disadvantage negotiating with Bank A were it not for the fact that I had taken the time and energy to cultivate multiple additional relationships at Bank B and Bank C, and therefore had an exit door when Bank A tried to jam me about something. You need to run your personal financial affairs like a business, because that's what you're up against -- another business called a bank that's looking to maximize their profits.

Also, there's no rule that says you have to get all your services from the same bank. They're not your friends and you should make them compete for every piece of your business, especially when it comes to mortgages. A few interest points or fees saved as a result of your being able to play one lender off against another can add up to a lot of dollars saved over time.

So my advice is to spread things around and create some alternatives for yourself. Sooner or later the day will come when you'll be glad you did

September 2, 2020
4:08 pm
Loonie
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 6406
Member Since:
October 21, 2013
sp_UserOnlineSmall Online

Londonguy said

You need to run your personal financial affairs like a business, because that's what you're up against -- another business called a bank that's looking to maximize their profits.
 

Very well said. Everyone should pay attention to this rule of thumb.
It doesn't mean you can't or won't do business with them, but it has to be mutually beneficial. If it's not, they will "walk away" by refusing to budge, - and so can you.

September 2, 2020
4:16 pm
dwdrajesh
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 30
Member Since:
April 18, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Loonie said
To answer your question, you need to do the math. I'm not sure why you are not doing it. It sounds like you don't really want to be bothered with moving the money. Your choice.

RBC: 17K, at 1%, compounded annually x 18 months = approx 17,255.
Oaken: 17K at 1.95%, compounded annually x 18 months = approx 17,500.

Even after you deduct the transfer fee that RBC charges, you will be about $200 ahead at Oaken. If that doesn't matter to you, then so be it.

I think you are too concerned about the fee. It's the cost of doing business with RBC, which is never going to pay you a great rate.

I would ask RBC if there is a fee for closing your RSP, which you appear to be intending to do at the end of this next term. I looked in vain for a list of their fees online, but it's quite possible they will charge you $50 or more for that too, making it unavoidable. I was charged an outrageous $100 to close a similar RSP at National Bank a few years ago. Remember too that these fees will very likely increase.

I have had some very bad experiences with RBC lately and would not give them a penny of my business. That's my bias. This is reinforced when I find them hiding their fee schedule.  

I have yet to call them and ask but it seems its $135 for RRSP transfer out. Thanks

September 2, 2020
5:03 pm
Loonie
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 6406
Member Since:
October 21, 2013
sp_UserOnlineSmall Online

I know it's likely to be $135 for investment accounts with their discount brokerage but it shouldn't be that much for an ordinary GIC, which does not require a brokerage account.
Is it a brokerage account?

In any event, it will likely only cost more if you do it later. And be sure to check on any fee for closing it out.

September 2, 2020
5:10 pm
Loonie
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 6406
Member Since:
October 21, 2013
sp_UserOnlineSmall Online

At the time we got our mortgage, eons ago, I had an account with a credit union and one with RBC. I'd been with RBC for 8 years at that point. I also had some RSPs in some smaller financial institutions.

National Bank got our mortgage business though, as they made the best offer at the time.

September 2, 2020
5:19 pm
dwdrajesh
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 30
Member Since:
April 18, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Loonie said
I know it's likely to be $135 for investment accounts with their discount brokerage but it shouldn't be that much for an ordinary GIC, which does not require a brokerage account.
Is it a brokerage account?

In any event, it will likely only cost more if you do it later. And be sure to check on any fee for closing it out.  

Thanks @Loonie. It was an ordinary GIC locked-in which expired and as you suggested, I told them to move it to a normal RRSP savings account which they did. Thanks for the suggestion though. Also, I talked to Oaken customer service just now, he told me that they will give the best rate from the last 30 days. So, lets say I start the transfer on Sep2nd, and he told me once they get the form on mail, it takes 3-4 weeks. Assuming Sep 30th, they get RBC's reply, they will give me the best rate from the past 30 days. So I guess, as you said, if their GIC rate is going down on Wednesday, I better send the mail before then? 🙂

September 2, 2020
5:52 pm
Loonie
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 6406
Member Since:
October 21, 2013
sp_UserOnlineSmall Online

If you want the old rate at Oaken, you have no time to lose. I am not familiar with the online sign-up system so don't know how long that might take. The only reason it takes 3 to 4 weeks is because Oaken is allowing for the fact that RBC might be slow. I did a transfer from Oaken to Meridian last year and it took 3 business days start to finish. I already had accounts established at both ends.
Your transfer fee should not be more than $100, and should be less, but I can't guarantee.

September 2, 2020
6:23 pm
dwdrajesh
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 30
Member Since:
April 18, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Do you guys know what this ' Personalized cheque for new contribution(made payable either to Oaken Financial or to yourself) • No cash payments, moneyorders or counter cheques accepted" means? I am trying to transfer from RBC, so what is this cheque for? Thanks

September 2, 2020
6:35 pm
GICinvestor
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 670
Member Since:
April 26, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Try this. Contact Oaken and see if you can do :

Open, online, a RRSP GIC Account as a non current customer.
Application will likely be much longer than if a current customer.
Select the term, years....and today’s rate will be assigned
For the amount, enter the approximate amount
Make a note of that you are transferring an approximate amount RRSP funds from RBC. There is a field for that in the GIC process.
That in the past, has held the door open and locked the rate.
Get on it, quickly, the transfer process, and courier it.
Also include a copy of RBC RRSP value and any investment account number for the RRSP. State it is to be all cash in your RRSP savings account.
Keep a copy of the GIC application and a copy of the transfer form.
Don’t be surprised that RBC calls you.
Oaken will follow up with RBC if they move slowly.

Hubert handles very similar to above as well.

September 3, 2020
7:51 am
dwdrajesh
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 30
Member Since:
April 18, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Thanks a lot all of you guys. I just talked to an agent from Oaken on the chat and he told me the T2033 could be emailed after signing the printed form , they dont do this normally but are allowing because of Covid situation. Anyways, he told they will give the best rate from the last 30 days, so looks like its good. I think I will go with Oaken , I dont see any other bank offering rates similar to this one. Thanks again guys.

September 8, 2020
2:42 pm
dwdrajesh
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 30
Member Since:
April 18, 2020
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Thanks a lot guys, I sent the transfer form my mail. Hopefully they will do it soon. Another quick question, I am planning to create a TFSA too with Oaken. Do you guys know how Oaken Accounts are created? the one I sent the letter is for RRSP, so once they have my details, if I want to open another account, lets say a TFSA or a normal savings account, will I have to send the letter my postal mail everytime or once you have your details in their system, everything else is online after that? Normally, the other online bank I deal with, Tangerine, does everything online. Thanks a lot again.

No permission to create posts

Please write your comments in the forum.