Interest rates dropping, economy slowing down | Page 2 | General financial discussion | Discussion forum

Please consider registering
guest

sp_LogInOut Log In sp_Registration Register

Register | Lost password?
Advanced Search

— Forum Scope —




— Match —





— Forum Options —





Minimum search word length is 3 characters - maximum search word length is 84 characters

No permission to create posts
sp_Feed Topic RSS sp_TopicIcon
Interest rates dropping, economy slowing down
February 2, 2019
6:23 pm
Vatox
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 448
Member Since:
October 29, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Nah, the tin won’t work! You need the real stuff, like mine, aluminum foil.sf-laughsf-cool

February 2, 2019
7:19 pm
Loonie
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 5159
Member Since:
October 21, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Bill said
I agree, people who live in large cities with all their wealth in electronic blips or pieces of paper, their goose is cooked. History is instructive, shows some options for when things hit the fan. I started my learning decades ago by reading about who did best and who did worst during the desperate times in social-order-breaking-down Germany/Austria between the world wars. Very helpful to me, but I'd stress the key is that at the end of the day you have to implement. Otherwise no point wasting your time and just scaring yourself.  

Implement what?
That's the question here.

February 3, 2019
7:08 am
Bill
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 1364
Member Since:
September 11, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Loonie, that is the question, what to do? To me, it's up to everyone to figure out for themselves what, if anything, is not so much doable but something that they will actually do, (and plan is best begun to be executed asap in adult life, in my opinion). For example, someone who is older, has no kids, no younger and stronger generations coming into their family, is not hale and hearty, might have some physical limitations or health issues, has always lived (and so is only comfortable) in the midst of a huge metropolitan area, well that person to me maybe should just keep their fingers crossed. Others, on the other hand, might have a few or even many attributes/assets they can parlay into action, if they've the will to do so. (P.S. I thought I gave a strong hint about my opinion re "what to do? when I said people in big cities - I meant with 100% of their assets tied up in big-city stuff, access to zero rural or remoter area resources - have their gooses cooked, they're 100% at the mercy of their civilization's upheavals. Maybe suits them, not me. But I'm the last guy to advise others to do what I've done - in fact, the opposite suits me just fine, quite happy if the big metro areas of the world are where 99.9% of the modern humans want to congregate.)

February 3, 2019
7:48 am
Top It Up
Member
Members (temp break)
Forum Posts: 1363
Member Since:
December 17, 2016
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Bill said

To me, it's up to everyone to figure out for themselves what, if anything, is not so much doable but something that they will actually do, (and plan is best begun to be executed asap in adult life, in my opinion).  

So our personal existence is tied to a big city dwelling and a cottage in a national park. If the infrastructure implodes BOTH residences are at risk albeit less so at the cottage. At the cottage we are on electricity for power and heat, we draw water from the lake and use a septic field, we have a wood burning fireplace. We also have a stand-by generator should the power go out for an extended period. Are we protected from calamity, maybe, but frankly, I spend zero time thinking about Armageddon because I'd sooner spend my time planning and taking trips to Europe. I would guess our real at risk is that we have zero money stuffed in our mattresses, other than $1,000 cash in the house.

February 3, 2019
8:54 am
Vatox
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 448
Member Since:
October 29, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Ohh , the irony!

February 3, 2019
5:08 pm
Bill
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 1364
Member Since:
September 11, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Where did the positive comment about Trump's handling of the US economy (related to the thread) go? Search "Trump" in the box above, lots of negative comments in 2018 re Trump on this site, no problem - ?? (P.S. I'm personally neutral on the guy, some good, some bad, not my country.)

February 3, 2019
5:38 pm
Peter
Admin
Forum Posts: 1006
Member Since:
May 15, 2007
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Bill said
Where did the positive comment about Trump's handling of the US economy (related to the thread) go? Search "Trump" in the box above, lots of negative comments in 2018 re Trump on this site, no problem - ?? (P.S. I'm personally neutral on the guy, some good, some bad, not my country.)  

I deleted it and will continue to delete posts that stray too far into politics, positive or negative regarding any politician or party. If anybody wants to discuss that further, please create a separate thread. Thanks!

February 6, 2019
11:26 am
Vatox
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 448
Member Since:
October 29, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Housing market slowed 40% in January.

February 6, 2019
11:34 am
Top It Up
Member
Members (temp break)
Forum Posts: 1363
Member Since:
December 17, 2016
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

From RBC -

... Activity levels remain historically low, especially in Vancouver where home resales are running some 36% below their 10-year average. But the good news is that activity didn’t slide any further in January. The Toronto Real Estate Board said today that home resales rose by 3.4% between December and January on a seasonally-adjusted basis, and (unadjusted) data re- leased Monday by the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver lead us to believe that resales rose roughly by the same magnitude in Vancouver.

--------------------------------

From the Ottawa Real Estate Board -

“January is typically one of the slowest months of the year for local real estate,” new OREB president Dwight Delahunt said in a statement. “Yet in spite of the record cold and snowfall, unit sales are up almost 16 per cent. This is the highest number of January transactions we have experienced in decades.”

February 6, 2019
12:41 pm
hotmony
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 442
Member Since:
February 20, 2018
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Vatox said
Housing market slowed 40% in January.  

Housing is not the whole economy a slowing will free up funds for other things.

February 8, 2019
9:04 am
hotmony
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 442
Member Since:
February 20, 2018
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

OTTAWA -- The country saw a rush of 66,800 net new jobs in January in a gain fuelled by a hiring surge in the private sector, Statistics Canada said Friday.Economists had expected the addition of 8,000 jobs for the month. The biggest boost came from the number of private-sector employee positions, which climbed by 111,500 in January for the category's biggest month-to-month increase since the agency started collecting the data point in 1976.

March 29, 2019
8:48 am
hotmony
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 442
Member Since:
February 20, 2018
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Canada's economy surprises with 0.3% growth in January

Statistics Canada reported Friday that 18 of 20 industries the data agency tracks got bigger.

Scotiabank economist Derek Holt said the weakness in oil was certainly significant, but he was encouraged by strength just about everywhere else.

"There is more to the economy in the Great White North than just oil and that's the exclamation point attached to this growth reading," Holt said.

"This is significant because it was not long ago when there was widespread agreement that the economy would stumble into the new year given energy sector challenges."

DePratto was also encouraged by the breadth of the gains in just about every sector.

"We were expecting a more muted report, but ... we got a solid print, front to back."

CBC

March 30, 2019
7:12 pm
steveson
Newbie
Members
Forum Posts: 1
Member Since:
March 30, 2019
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

just joined this forum today as this topic caught my interest. I think basically the system has to reset but by how much and by how far I'm not sure either. The best thing I would do is enjoy each and ever day as it rolls by as we all watch this circus unfold. Fiat money is really a ponzi scheme anyway as it is based on an ever expanding economy. The trick will be to see how long the powers that be keep this thing going until they can't anymore. Honestly, I'm surprised they even kept it going this long, but one would think they could have done better considering how much they took from savers by keeping interest rates so low.

March 31, 2019
9:53 am
Vatox
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 448
Member Since:
October 29, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

For sure Steveson. The whole notion of needing the economy to always grow is a complete scam. And it will be a very hard fall, the longer they drag it on.

March 31, 2019
2:34 pm
hotmony
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 442
Member Since:
February 20, 2018
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Vatox said
The whole notion of needing the economy to always grow is a complete scam. And it will be a very hard fall, the longer they drag it on.  

Right and hence my thesis rates need to rise to knock out corrupt speculation

March 31, 2019
10:52 pm
Vatox
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 448
Member Since:
October 29, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

hotmony said

Right and hence my thesis rates need to rise to knock out corrupt speculation  

I agree with the idea that rates need to rise. I just see a huge fallout and consequences if they tighten policy at this time. Perhaps things will change in a few months.

April 3, 2019
10:10 am
hotmony
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 442
Member Since:
February 20, 2018
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Stock market is indicating higher interest rates

April 3, 2019
11:46 am
Vatox
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 448
Member Since:
October 29, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

Bond yields moved up slightly, but still way too low. There is way more likelihood for a rate cut, a 25 basis point drop would bring the overnight rate just under the 5 year bond.

I Say a rate cut is a bad idea, but I think it is definitely more likely than a rate increase. I’m still looking at a rate hold. We have 3 weeks until the next rate decision so much can change.

April 17, 2019
7:37 pm
Vatox
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 448
Member Since:
October 29, 2017
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

With inflation up at 1.9% and bond yields rising, the notion of a rate cut has disappeared and there is nothing indicating any urgency for a rate hike. I think the BoC will hold the rate next week.

April 17, 2019
7:51 pm
Loonie
Member
Members
Forum Posts: 5159
Member Since:
October 21, 2013
sp_UserOfflineSmall Offline

It feels like a rate cut has already been built into the rates we are being offered as depositors.

No permission to create posts

Please write your comments in the forum.